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Winding cobbled streets, lively city life, and unmatched seaside beauty: Poland’s hotels tuck you between architecture that spans thousands of years. Enjoy pierogis on the town square, bustling shopping districts, and unparalleled views of the Baltic Sea. For those looking for an enriching vacation to East Central Europe, look no further than Warsaw, Krakow, Wrocław, Łódź, or the Baltic Coast.

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Poland Hotels

Poland’s Hotels are guaranteed to enrich; surrounding you with Poland’s heavy history, the varied architecture of a country of rebirth, and the exciting promise of progression and innovation at every turn down cobbled alleyways. With hotels perfectly placed in Poland’s major cities, it’s easy to strike up the perfect balance between refreshing comfort and engaging city life.

Hotels in Poland: Enduring architecture, youthful city life, and magical views

Warsaw: Poland’s “Phoenix City”

The capital and largest city in Poland, Warsaw, boasts palaces, parks, and architecture that spans time. Suffering near destruction at the end of World War II, Warsaw has earned the name “Phoenix City” in its reestablishment as the country’s capital over the last half century. One can see this history in the jagged skyline, with architecture ranging from the Gothic to the Neoclassical periods, and everything in-between. A day in Warsaw is as dynamic as the landscape. The streets are filled with the energy of a young city; together with a bustling nightlife, a suite of revered Polish eateries, as well as captivating museums that shed light on the city’s troubled past. Enjoy a jaunt through the Main Market Square in Old Town, named a UNESCO World Heritage Site, or the New World Street, a lively shopping district, between always necessary pit stops for potato pancakes and a refreshing Polish pilsner. The Staszic, Wilanów, and Belweder, and Krasiński Palaces inspire awe and their lush gardens alone are worth spending a day traversing. In historic hotels in the city center or park-side, enjoy lavish feasts with impeccable service in the dining room, and you’ll feel as if you’ve never left the palace. Make time after dinner to bask in golden light on the hotel terrace, and to reflect on the energy of this city of revival.

Krakow: Stone Age to Modern Metropolis

Krakow, the once capital of Poland, has been previously deemed the European Capital of Culture, the UNESCO City of Literature, and selected as host of the 2016 World Youth Day. Revered for its Eastern European beauty, Poland’s second largest city straddles the Vistula River near the southern border. In Krakow’s Old Town, pass by the stately Opera House and then duck down into the underground passages that weave through and past the Medieval Times. Or, meander through one of the forty parks in Krakow to get your fill of nature just a block away from the lively winding streets. This city beams with the history and beauty of thousands of years, growing from a Stone Age settlement to the anomalous metropolis known today. In a room with a view of the Roman Catholic Cathedral, which promises to dizzy with its green-gold embellished alters and royal pews, you’ll find yourself right on the line between ancient and modern in the trendy bliss of a luxurious hotel.

Wrocław & Łódź: History & spirit

Find your dream hotel in the heart of Wrocław, a city known for its youthful energy and impressive history. A true charmer of a city, Wrocław lies on the banks of the Oder River in the southwestern part of Poland. At various times housing the royalty of the Kingdom of Poland, Kingdom of Bohemia, Kingdom of Hungary, and of the 2012 Euro Football Championship, Wrocław is an understated and total gem of a city. Whether it’s craft beer, traditional Polish pierogis & kielbasa, or all three, indulged in with a view of Książ Castle, you’ll be in good company surrounded by the largest youth and student population in the country. Get comfortable in an extravagant hotel just a block away from Wrocław’s gorgeous main square, replete with views of red-roofed catholic cathedrals and the charming architecture of a timeless city. Łódź, the third-largest Polish city and one especially riddled with the dark history of WWII, tells a story of revitalization. Located inland, between Wrocław, Krakow, and Warsaw, this colorful place comes equipped with a packed calendar of festivals, a long list of memorials and sculptures, and one of the best modern art museums in Poland. Now the home of one of the most internationally renowned film schools and one of the longest commercial streets in the world, Piotrkowska Street, Łódź is an industrial city remarkable in its blend of monument and progress. At a hotel equidistance from the beautiful Old Cemetery, two of Łódź’s favorite parks, and a massive shopping and museum district, you can plan your day from the window of your deluxe room.

Baltic Sea: Picture perfect port-cities

Poland’s Baltic Coast is full of surprises, uncrowded beaches, lush forests, and seaside fun. Gdańsk is Poland’s major seaport city, situated on the Baltic Coast at the northernmost border of the country. In an ideal kinship, Gdańsk makes up a third of the metropolitan conurbation, Tricity, together with Gydnia, and spa town, Sopot. At the mouth of the Motława River and connected with Warsaw by way of the Vistula River, Gdańsk sits at the crossroads of a magical waterscape, sure to impress with panoramic views of crystal-clear water. Although also haunted by the tragedies surrounding WWII, Poland’s Baltic Coast played an important role in the collapse of the Eastern Bloc during the latter half of the twentieth century. One can find more on Poland’s history in the Gdańsk’s Museum of the Second World War or in Gdynia’s Emigration Museum. During hot coastal summers, travel back even further in history and cruise along the Motława River through the Royal Route, a path through the city believed to have been trekked by kings. This picturesque coast promises all the makings for the perfect trip to the sea, best spent in a charming hotel right on the coast: Swim in sky-lit rooftop pools, drink wine on sandy beaches, or gear up for an amazing massage from a master.

Good to know

Language: Polish, a Slavic language existing somewhere between Czech and Slovak, may seem a particularly foreign tongue to untrained ears. But, at one time in history, Polish was considered to be the lingua franca both in academics and diplomats. Today, English is widely spoken throughout Poland, making it more than possible to get by without mastering the language with the rep, “hardest to learn”. To impress the locals, after clinking beer glasses, exclaim: Na Zdrowie! (Cheers!)

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