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Featuring traditional villa-like designs complemented by trendy modernist influences, Majorca’s range of small hotels boast spacious accommodation in one of Spain’s most idyllic islands. By day, explore the stunning natural environment, sandy beaches, and hidden coves of the island, and by night revel in Palma’s famously vibrant nightlife. Majorca is a diverse island offering stunning scenery, Spanish traditions, and a party atmosphere – a gem of the Mediterranean offering something for every traveler.

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Majorca Small Hotels

Just east of Spanish mainland lies a collection of islands known for their natural beauty, azure blue coves, and sleepy villages. Majorca, the largest of the Balearic Islands, is famous for its rich history and culture which spans thousands of years. These days, Majorca is dotted with gorgeous small hotels geared towards travelers seeking the best of both worlds: a destination full of hiking, site-seeing, and beach combing – but also one which boasts an eclectic nightlife peppered with stylish bars, delectable restaurants, and luxury nightclubs.

Explore the Island of Majorca: Our selected destinations

Palma: Majorca’s proud capital city

The capital city of Palma is breathtaking. A labyrinth of sand-colored lanes peppered with cozy cafes and boutique storefronts make this port city a joy to discover. What’s more, the city was founded by the Romans in 120BC, making it rich with archeological discoveries from the Roman, Byzantine, and Medieval periods. Hike up to the 14th century Bellver Castle for sweeping views over the city and ocean, and learn more about Palma’s artistic and historical legacy at the Museo de Mallorca. Palma is also gifted with long, wide sandy beaches with warm, shallow water for little ones to splash around in. Small boutique hotels in Palma will usually provide a swimming pool too, so you to cool off with a little more privacy. Finally, it would be amiss to mention Palma without talking about its famous nightlife. As the sun sets, the city’s clubs, bars, and restaurants open their doors, each vying for your attention with neon lights, delicious cocktails, vintage and contemporary music, and an excitable atmosphere.

Alcúdia: Stunning beaches on the Badia de Pollença

Directly north-east from Palma lays the sunny coastal village of Alcúdia, famous for its bustling harbor, turquoise water, and old town dotted with small, traditional restaurants. This village is equally full of history, which you can discover first-hand by taking a walk along its 14th-century walls and visiting the remains of an old Roman settlement just outside. Alcúdia is the perfect location for a break in a small hotel, as the village is primed for families and couples looking for a relaxing beach vacation with plenty of activities on-hand to keep everyone entertained. One of the best ways to explore Badia de Pollença – and Majorca, for that matter – is by bicycle. Intermediate and experienced cyclists will devour northern Majorca’s incredible scenery, and even get the chance to stop off for a swim from one of the island’s hidden beaches. For those seeking a more relaxed vacation, head to S’illot Beach. A somewhat secret cove just four kilometers from Alcúdia, S’illot is protected from the wind by a small rocky island opposite the shore, making it perfect for swimming, snorkeling, and sunbathing away from the sunbeds and crowds of the island’s major beach resorts.

Valldemossa: An Idyllic town in the Serra de Tramuntana

Despite its size, Majorca’s topography is astonishing. Running along the spine of the island, the Tramuntana mountain range dominates the northern coast, throwing dramatic, jagged cliffs out into the ocean. Buried among the mountain’s peaks lays the quaint hamlet of Valldemossa, a charmingly traditional town that feels a world away from the Palma’s hectic nightlife. Surrounded by rolling hills and lush forests, Valldemossa beckons with golden buildings and cultural attractions. The captivating 13th century landmark known as Real Cartuja was once a royal residence and grand monastery, and once housed composer Frederic Chopin during the winter of 1838 – an example of how Valldemossa’s beauty has inspired artists and creatives for generations. The town’s rural location also makes it a popular base for outdoor enthusiasts looking to hike, bike, and rock climb around the surrounding Tramuntana. There are also several golf courses nearby for fans of the sport to practice their swing in enchanting Mediterranean surroundings.